Home > Charitable Giving, communications, Resources > Taping the Giving Power of Millennials

Taping the Giving Power of Millennials

The typical description of a Millennial (AKA Generation Y, born in the early 80’s to the early 2000s) is someone who is highly adept with technology, civic-minded, and culturally liberal.

As Millennials move into the workforce, how will non-profits tap their giving and volunteering power?

According to the Center on Philanthropy at IU, Millennial donors are most likely to be motivated by a desire to make the world a better place. They give consistent with their income, education level, frequency of religious attendance and marital status.

As noted in a presentation DIGITAL MILLENNIALS Charitable Giving & Cause Marketing,
there are several unifying demands of Millennials:

–Tell me how my contribution matters: Millennials want to know the impact of
their donation. This is key for their satisfaction and future donations.

–Reason beyond marketing: Millennials are skeptical of brands taking up social
causes and will most often question the true intent of the sponsoring company.

— Similar to other consumer segments, Millennial are more connected when giving
to a charity to which they have a personal connection.

— Religion is viewed by Millennials as a charitable organization and can be a
powerful force when it comes to charitable giving.

So what are the best ways to encourage Millennials to give? The Philanthropy Journal reported on a study in April of this year that donors in the U.S. ages 20 to 35 prefer to give to organizations they trust, are motivated to give by a compelling mission or cause, and prefer to give online.

And those who donated the most also volunteered the most. Eighty-four percent of respondents said they are most likely to give when they fully trust an organization, and 90 percent said they would stop giving if they do not trust an organization.

What’s your experience in taping this generation’s giving to charitable causes?

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